Faculty

  • Cherie Redelings

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4280
  • Rob Campbell

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4203
    Bio
  • Tom Crowley

    Teacher & Director of Global Studies
    (858) 442-9378
    Bio
  • Jill Duehr

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4255
  • Dan Egan

    Short-Term Substitute Teacher
    Bio
  • Jeremy Howard

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x4213
    Bio
  • Joseph Kurz

    Bio
  • Mary Ong-Dean

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x4404
    Bio
  • Karen Parker

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x4239
  • Lyford Rome

    Teacher and Technology Coordinator
    858-569-7900 x 4131
    Bio
  • Eric Taylor

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4190
    Bio
  • Marc Thiebach

    Assistant Head of Upper School
    858-569-7900 x4140
    Bio
  • Phil Trotter

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4192
  • Rai Wilson

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4408
  • Chuck Wineholt

    Teacher
    858-569-7900 x 4183
  • Kevin Yaley

    Head of School
    858-569-7900 x 4103

Select A Department

US-Social Studies

  • American History

    American History (11-12)
    This course presents a chronological overview of American history from the pre-colonial period to the present.  Students will develop a command of systematic factual knowledge and the ability to analyze that knowledge.  The course will include lecture, discussion, essay writing, objective testing, critical examination of sources, documentary material, graphs and charts.  Major movements including Nationalism, Agrarianism, Expansionism, Conservatism, Liberalism and Urbanization are studied.  In addition, a research paper and outside reading in economics will be required.  
  • AP Art History

    AP Art History (10-12) - Weighted
    Prerequisites for non-seniors:  Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria for AP US History (for juniors); concurrent enrollment in Global History II Honors (for sophomores)
    This course is a chronological survey of world art, designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam.  Beginning with Paleolithic art and ending with postmodernism, students will study art works in their original context in order to achieve an understanding of their purpose and meaning in the society that produced them.  Key historical documents will provide unique insights into interaction between culture and the creative process. Students will create a portfolio containing three larger studio projects and at least three smaller projects.  Artwork will reflect the influence of historical media, techniques, and processes.  Students will develop skills in architectural design, sculpture, drawing, painting and digital imagery by producing 2D and 3D projects. Students will also visit local and online museums, view films and digital images of artworks.  Short research projects will promote development of skills in research, writing and reasoning about the interaction between art and its historical context.
  • AP Economics

    AP Economics (11-12) - Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    In this introductory college level course, students will become familiar with the vocabulary, concepts and principles of economics.  The course will include macroeconomics and microeconomics.  Students will investigate the scope and method of economic analysis, economic resources, the monetary system, income determination, economic growth and stability.  Also studied are the price system, market structures, competition, public policy, income distribution, theory of the firm, and resource allocation.  
  • AP European History

    AP European History (12) - Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    This advanced course exposes the student to factual narrative and principal themes in modern European history.  Through the frequent preparation of essays based on historical documents, students will have the opportunity to develop an ability to analyze often conflicting historical evidence.  Through lectures, extensive readings and discussions, the course will cover the political, diplomatic, cultural, social and economic history of modern and contemporary Europe.    
  • AP Government & Politics

    AP Government & Politics (12) - Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    This course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States.  Study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and analysis of specific case studies are included.  The course requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality.  Students will examine the constitutional underpinnings of American government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of the national government, as well as civil rights issues.  
  • AP Human Geography

    AP Human Geography (12) - Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    The course introduces students to the importance of spatial organization ¾ the location of places, people, and events, and the connections among places and landscapes ¾ in the understanding of human life.  Geographic concepts emphasized in the course are location, space, scale, pattern, regionalization and place.  Students will also study population growth and movement, patterns of culture, economic use of Earth, political organization of space, human settlement patterns and urbanization of cities.  Mapwork, mathematical formulas, models and qualitative geographical data are included in the coursework.
  • AP United States History

    AP United States History (11-12) - Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with problems and materials in U.S. History.  The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses.  Students should learn to assess historical materials-their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance-and weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in the historical scholarship.  An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.
  • Art History

    Art History (12) This course is a chronological survey of world art. Beginning with Paleolithic art and ending with postmodernism, students will study art works in their original context in order to achieve an understanding of their purpose and meaning in the society that produced them. Key historical documents will provide unique insights into interaction between culture and the creative process. Students will create a portfolio containing three larger studio projects and at least three smaller projects. Artwork will reflect the influence of historical media, techniques, and processes. Students will develop skills in architectural design, sculpture, drawing, painting and digital imagery by producing 2D and 3D projects. Students will also visit local and online museums, view films and digital images of artworks. Short research projects will promote development of skills in research, writing and reasoning about the interaction between art and its historical context.
  • Economics

    Economics (12)
    In this introductory college level course, students will become familiar with the vocabulary, concepts and principles of economics.  The course will include macroeconomics and microeconomics.  Students will investigate the scope and method of economic analysis, economic resources, the monetary system, income determination, economic growth and stability.  Also studied are the price system, market structures, competition, public policy, income distribution, theory of the firm, and resource allocation.  
  • Global History I

    Global History I (9)
    In this course students will explore the history of major civilizations from 10,000 BCE to 1750 CE in a sequential, thematic approach. In each of five historical eras, students will survey a range of themes to gain a “big picture” idea of the varieties of human experience worldwide. To supplement this panorama, students will take a closer look at how one theme plays out inter-regionally in each era and across time. Finally, in each era, students examine the continuities within the traditions of particular cultures, with attention to the development of ideas and institutions. There are five major units of study and one long-term project, a research paper.
  • Global History II

    Global History II (10)
    This course offers a combined chronological and topical view of modern world history from the Renaissance to the present.  Students will pursue a factual and thematic knowledge of the emerging world culture while developing analytical, interpretive, and critical thinking skills to enhance their understanding.  The course includes lectures, discussions, group projects, and oral presentations.  Essay writing and research techniques will also be developed and refined throughout the year.  
  • Global History II Honors

    Global History II Honors (10) - weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    This course explores the history of major civilizations from 1600 CE to Present Day in a sequential, thematic approach. In each of three historical eras, students will survey a range of themes to gain a "big picture" idea of the varieties of human experience worldwide. To supplement this panorama, students will take a closer look at how one theme in each era plays out inter-regionally and across time. Finally, in each era they will study at least one topic in depth, examining the continuities within the traditions of that time period, with attention to the development of ideas and institutions. In addition to the three units of study, students will develop skills in research, public speaking, debate, assessing the reliability of sources, corroboration, analytical reading and writing, and critical thinking.
  • Global Issues & Social Justice

    Global Issues and Social Justice (12) This survey course explores justice issues throughout the world with the goal of understanding and critically evaluating causes and solutions for suffering. Topics will range from the AIDS pandemic in Africa to homelessness in San Diego. Students will be encouraged to take an active role in promoting change within the school community and beyond. In order to acquire a deeper understanding of complex social issues, students will be required to develop independent projects, read from a variety of novels and journals, research different models for activism, and participate in classroom and community forums. The first trimester project will center around a collaborative multi-media project that focuses on our region. We will produce a documentary and interactive ebook with the Honors Latin American Literatue and Introduction to Journalism classes.
  • Global Issues & Social Justice

    Global Issues and Social Justice (12)
    This survey course explores justice issues throughout the world with the goal of understanding and critically evaluating causes and solutions for suffering.  Topics will range from the AIDS pandemic in Africa to homelessness in San Diego. Students will be encouraged to take an active role in promoting change within the school community and beyond.  In order to acquire a deeper understanding of complex social issues, students will be required to develop independent projects, read from a variety of novels and journals, research different models for activism, and participate in classroom and community forums. The first trimester project will center around a collaborative multi-media project that focuses on our region. We will produce a documentary and interactive ebook with the Honors Latin American Literature and Introduction to Journalism classes.
  • Government & Politics

    Government & Politics (12) This course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States. Study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and analysis of specific case studies are included. The course requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality. Students will examine the constitutional underpinnings of American government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of the national government, as well as civil rights issues
  • History of Technology

    History of Technology (10-12)                                                                                                                                                                                                    One trimester
    Offered winter trimester only
    This seminar-style course will explore the role of technology throughout the history of human culture, spanning from the paleolithic to the 21st century. We will draw from archeology, engineering, science, the visual and performing arts, literature, and philosophy in a cross-disciplinary approach to history, taught from a thematic perspective (work, health, transport, etc.) rather than a chronological one. Technology has not only transformed the environment in which we live, but has also shaped the ways with which we relate to each other and perceive our world. Advances in knowledge and inventions have either disrupted or reinforced political, economic, and social systems over the years, changing the texture and context of daily life.  We will examine this human built world and how material culture affects society, political structures, and our world view. 
  • Honors American History

    Honors American History (11) – Weighted
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of Departmental Criteria
    This survey course in American History presents a chronological overview of American history from the pre-colonial period to the present.  The course will address political, social, economic, intellectual and cultural history.  As an honors level course, there will be a heavy emphasis placed on writing.  The students will be expected to gather factual knowledge and to be able to respond effectively and persuasively to interpretive and analytical questions.  Topics covered will include the Colonial Period, the American Revolution and the Constitution, the Jeffersonian Era, American Nationalism, the Jacksonian Era, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Populism and Progressivism, the New Deal, Foreign Policy, The World Wars, the Cold War, and Modern Times.
  • Human Geography

    Human Geography (12) The course introduces students to the importance of spatial organization ? the location of places, people, and events, and the connections among places and landscapes ? in the understanding of human life. Geographic concepts emphasized in the course are location, space, scale, pattern, regionalization and place. Students will also study population growth and movement, patterns of culture, economic use of Earth, political organization of space, human settlement patterns and urbanization of cities. Mapwork, mathematical formulas, models and qualitative geographical data are included in the coursework.
  • International Relations

    International Relations (10-12)                                                                                                               One trimester
    Offered fall trimester only
    This course will enable students to analyze the complexities and processes involved in world politics, economics, law, and international affairs. Students will be exposed to key subfields of the discipline and relevant issues such as: the history, analysis and theory of international relations; contemporary issues of globalization and their economic impact; the nature, historical development, and sources of international law and diplomacy; rationales, processes, and institutions of multilateral governance; sovereignty, foreign policy and role of international organizations. 
  • Philosophy

    Philosophy (10-12)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  One trimester
    Offered spring trimester only
    Philosophy is the systematic, critical examination of the way in which we judge, evaluate and act, with the aim of making ourselves wiser, more self-reflective human beings.  It is the human mind thinking about its origin, nature and existence.  Philosophy is about asking questions.  It is the free inquiry into the limits of human knowledge concerning the mystery of our existence.  Philosophy is constructive and creative inquiry.  It is an attempt to demonstrate how all things relate.  In this course, students will be introduced to the basic fields of study and discourse within philosophy: epistemology, metaphysics (ontology), logic, ethics, social/political philosophy and aesthetics.  The students will look at the origin and development of philosophy, while participating in the self-reflective process.
  • Psychology

    Psychology (12)                                                              This is a survey course that covers the science of the mind and behavior.  Topics will include the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, personality, memory, and psychological disorders. Other topics covered will be determined by student interest during the course.
  • Sociology

    Sociology (12) Why do people do what they do? Sociology is the science that studies human society and social behavior. It is how we relate to each other, to other groups, and between our group and other groups. Sociologists concentrate their attention on social interaction ? the ways in which people relate to one another and influence each other?s behavior. Consequently, sociologists tend to focus on the group rather than on the individual.
  • World Religions

    World Religions (10-12) One trimester Offered winter trimester only In this course, we will examine several faiths mainly through primary sources and texts. We will examine the origins of religions in general and the development of particular faiths, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. We will also look at the art and literature inspired by these faiths as we seek to understand religion?s place in different communities.
Francis Parker School is a private, independent, coeducational, college preparatory day school for students in Junior Kindergarten through Grade 12 from across San Diego County. Founded in 1912, the Lower School is located on the Mission Hills Campus with the Upper and Middle Schools on the Linda Vista Campus. Parker's mission is to inspire a diverse community of independent thinkers whose academic excellence, global perspective and strength of character prepare them to make a meaningful difference in the world.

Mission Hills Campus Lower School

4201 Randolph Street
San Diego, CA 92103
 

Linda Vista Campus Middle/Upper School

6501 Linda Vista Road
San Diego, CA 92111
858 / 569-7900