« 2018

2018

  • July

    These 9 friends have stuck together since grade 1 at the Lower School, earning badges and ultimately becoming Eagle Scouts before graduating in 2018.

    9 Members of the Class of 2018 Earn Eagle Scout Honor

    From Grade 1 to the 2018 commencement stage, nine Parker students stuck together to earn one of the greatest honors as members of the Boy Scouts of America: Eagle Scout.

    To earn the rank of Eagle, the scouts had to put in years worth of work and service to their community. They had to earn 21 merit badges; demonstrate leadership; and plan, lead, and complete a final service project before going before a review board to gain that final medal and badge.

    Each of the Parker alumni dedicated long hours to their final projects, raising funds, working with various stakeholders, and organizing teams of volunteers to carry out their vision. The projects helped serve the community at large and will make a lasting impact on those communities to come.

    Wyatt Williams ’18

    As a member of the Sacred Heart Parish in Ocean Beach, Wyatt helped prepare food to serve to dozens of homeless and low-income individuals in the area through the church’s Feeding the Hungry Ministry. Sacred Heart’s desire and capacity to do good inspired his final Eagle Scout Project; Wyatt knew he wanted to give back to the church that was already giving so much to its community.

    The church had been undertaking a renovation plan and Wyatt asked which task would be the most difficult and time-consuming. Wyatt then began drawing up the plans needed to fully landscape the exterior of the church’s cottages. Over 3 tons of dirt and tree stumps were cleared to make room for the new additions. Wyatt and his team of volunteers hammered bender board into place, installed irrigation tubing and control systems, and planted more than 70 drought-tolerant plants in the space before covering the top with mulch.

    In total, the project lasted about one week and involved more than 125 hours of manual labor.

    Wyatt joined the scouts as a cub scout in first grade. He says the Boy Scouts’ emphasis on community engagement is what drove him to continue through the program from cub to eagle: “We cannot forget who we are as a collective and that duty to others reigns supreme over self-preservation.”

    Wyatt is attending Santa Clara University in the fall to pursue a major in neuroscience. He will join fellow Parker alumni and Eagle Scouts Kurt Williams ’18 (who also happens to be his twin brother) and Jack Davey ’18.

    Jack Davey ’18

    As a senior patrol leader, Jack held the highest position of a scout—leading patrol meetings, scheduling events, and planning excursions. “It was fun being able to make decisions and plan where the troop would go for outings and hikes. It was exciting to be responsible for my friends and being the leader for our troop. I was also able to reach out and mentor younger scouts and troops as an SPL.”

    But even SPLs need to complete a final project to earn the highest honor of Eagle Scout. Jack set his sights on Morley Field, the dog park in San Diego’s Balboa Park. Jack worked with park rangers and fellow boy scouts to install new fence posts and run nearly 300 feet of cabling that would keep the dogs safe and give their owners greater peace of mind.

    Like many of his fellow Eagle Scouts who attended Parker, Jack joined the scouts as a cub when he was about 5 or 6. The scouts, he says, helped bond him and the other Parker students together from beginning to end.

    “It would have been more of a challenge if I didn’t have friends in my troop. We worked together to get our badges. The skills I learned will always stay with me,” says Jack.

    Jack will take those skills with him to Santa Clara University in the fall, where he plans to pursue a major in computer science. He will join fellow Eagle Scouts and Parker alumni Wyatt ’18 and Kurt Williams ’18.  

    Carson Cook ’18

    On his way to becoming an Eagle Scout, Carson chose an ambitious final project, focusing on the Pioneer Day School’s community recycling program. Pioneer Day School provides programs to help children with disabilities transition to public school. One of those programs is community recycling, through which kids collect recyclables from local residents and organizations to sort and bring to a recycling center. The program not only promotes recycling, but also gives the kids a chance to work on their visual and motor skills.

    Carson raised funds to clean up the area students use to sort the recycling, bring in new equipment, and secure the area with a lockable fence. With a team of volunteers, Carson brought in new and sturdier sorting bins, wall-mounted can crushers the kids could use easily and safely, and a chain-link fence that would keep the area secure.

    “Through these new additions,” says Carson, “I hope to incentivize the continued use of this program for years to come.”

    Ryan Austin ’18

    In a parking lot near San Diego’s Presidio Park, a newly-installed kiosk stands in the clay dirt and provides information to the park’s daily visitors. Its location is in a well-traveled area, and serves to benefit the numbers of people who visited the historic park each day. Ryan, who lives near the park and knew the once-dilapidated kiosk well, fixed his sights on it for the final project that would secure his rank of Eagle Scout.

    While tearing down and building a new stand may not seem like a massive undertaking, Ryan ran into many challenges both before and during installation. The first challenge was getting permission from the city, which raised concerns about the Native American burials located beneath the park. Another challenge arose on the day of installment, when Ryan and his crew of volunteers realized the ground they were attempting to dig into was solid clay.

    After bringing in an auger to break up the ground, Ryan and his team managed to build and install the new kiosk in a day, with Ryan returning the day after to install plexiglass—the final touch on the new display.

    Ryan’s journey from cub to Eagle Scout began in first grade, like many of his fellow Parker classmates who were also scouts.

    “I don’t think we all would have kept going if we didn’t have our friends in the troop,” says Ryan. “It’s fun and it’s a bonding experience. It got me out the door doing things I would have never done otherwise.”

    Ryan is heading to Daytona Beach, Florida later this summer where he will attend Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and pursue a major in aerospace engineering.

    Holden Enniss ’18 and William Keith ’18

    Having spent so many years together in the scouts earning merit badges, it seemed only natural to work together on the project that would help them attain the highest rank of Eagle Scout. Holden and William turned to Presidio Park and a retaining wall that had been constructed over time by various Eagle Scouts, including other Parker students.

    Holden and William contributed 50 feet to the retaining wall using 10-foot planks of redwood and railroad ties to connect each plank. The wall is not only designed to keep dirt and debris off of an adjacent hiking trail, it helps curb erosion and preserve an important piece of San Diego history.

    JT Melbourn ’18

    Following in his father’s footsteps, JT climbed the ranks from a young cub scout to the highest rank of Eagle. Beginning in the first grade, it was a long journey and a far climb, but worth every moment, according to JT.

    “Scouts prepared me to be able to take care of myself, and gave me the confidence to be independent. It got me to try things I wouldn’t have tried otherwise,” he says.

    But it wasn’t always his family’s legacy that kept him going through the years; it was the motivation he found in his friends, fellow Parker students, and the community they created at School and at scouts.

    “Without my friends, I wouldn’t have been as motivated to go as far as I did. Having the community really helped,” says JT.

    For his final project, JT repaired the handrails of an old footbridge located in Presidio Park, near the Taylor Street exit. It is a well-used footbridge, and JT was confident his project would have a big impact on a lot of people.

    With a group of his fellow troop members and parents, JT helped lead the day-long project that consisted of removing the old handrails and building and installing new ones. They reused the metal bolts from the old footbridge, but brought in new wood to custom-make fresh handrails.

    JT will be attending Seattle University in the fall with plans to pursue a career in law enforcement. His experience as a scout and the vast network the association lends to its members helped connect him to local law enforcement officers, including San Diego Sheriff William Gore and a special agent from the FBI’s local San Diego branch.

    Kurt Williams ’18

    Kurt didn’t have any construction experience before taking on his final Eagle Scout project at Sacred Heart Church in Ocean Beach. All he knew is he wanted to choose a project that would have a lasting impact on the community it benefited.

    “I looked up to the scouts who did the big projects that made an impact on the community. I wanted to do that too,” he says.

    After talking with the church’s leadership, he decided to build an outdoor patio where the youth group could hold their meetings. Kurt met with contractors and electricians to certify his project would be done correctly and up to code, and began a three-month process of fundraising to afford such an undertaking.

    Kurt and his group of volunteers tore out hundreds of square-feet worth of concrete, laid conduit lines and rebar, then a team of contractors came in to pour the concrete. When the project was complete, Kurt had successfully created a space where the 60-person youth group could meet and the church could grow.

    Kurt has been in the scouts since grade 1. He says the knowledge and skills he gained as a scout helped him develop as a person and helped him better serve the community in which he lived.

    “Scouts emboldens you to be a leader,” says Kurt.

    In the fall, Kurt will attend Santa Clara University along with his twin brother Wyatt, and fellow Parker alumnus and scout Jack Davey. Kurt plans to pursue a major in electrical engineering, with a minor in either business or finance.

    Jeremy McCulloch ’18

    For his Eagle Scout project, Jeremy focused on the Ronald McDonald House of San Diego. He and a team of volunteers helped build a new playhouse for the children who spend time at the center. Together, the team put in about 100 hours of manual labor.

    Before becoming an Eagle Scout, Jeremy was a Life Scout, the second highest rank in scouts.
    Read More
  • February

    Alumni Lancer Love Stories


    Olivia Nocon '99 and Nathan Nouskajian '98

    They’re sweethearts who went to high school together, but Olivia Nocon ’99 and Nathan Nouskajian ’98 aren’t traditional high school sweethearts. The two officially started dating on June 1, 1999, just before Olivia walked down the aisle at Commencement. Not having dated during high school made it “confusing” for their friends.

    “Our friends were perplexed,” said Olivia, laughing. “They couldn’t have imagined two totally different people being together.”

    Olivia, the extrovert, and Nathan, the introvert, complemented each other so well the two tied the knot on December 30, 2006 at Sunset Cliffs in San Diego--but not before a somewhat difficult proposal.

    “The proposal was impossible,” joked Nathan. “We’d been together so long that any deviation from our normal routine came with a thousand questions.”

    Nathan proposed at the couple’s favorite restaurant at the time, Top of the Market, and even though “the writing was on the wall,” Olivia was nevertheless surprised and excited.

    The wedding was a truly Parker affair. The wedding party and guests were made up of mostly Parker alumni and friends--after all, it was Parker that brought the bride and groom together.

    “I highly doubt we would have met if we hadn’t both been at Parker,” said Olivia. “It’s a nice feeling having known someone for so long.”

    Nearly a decade later, Nathan is a lawyer and Olivia takes care of their two children, Caden and Ava, both Lower School students at Parker. Neither can imagine their lives without the other.

    “Ollie makes my life better than I ever could have imagined,” said Nathan. “And even though we’re so different, it makes every day that much better being with her.”

    “This will sound contrived but it’s 100 percent genuine--I think Nathan is the kindest person I’ve ever known and the fact that he married me just blows my mind. I feel so incredibly lucky,” said Olivia.

    Carrie Snyder '97 and Victor Vilaplana '96

    As two Parker lifers, Carrie Snyder ‘97 and Victor Vilaplana ‘96 grew up together. Despite being a grade apart, they ended up in Mrs. Pope’s pre-calculus class during Victor’s senior year and quickly developed a friendship.

    “At first she thought I was trying to copy her math homework, but really I just wanted to talk to her,” said Victor.

    They started dating that summer, soon after Victor graduated from Parker and right before he moved north to start his freshman year at Stanford. Carrie attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, and the two eventually reunited in New York City where they lived together for three years.

    It was at their place in New York where Victor proposed to Carrie, who came home from her job as an investment banker at 11 pm to find Victor sitting on the couch, still dressed in his work clothes.

    “Everything was off,” said Carrie, who recalled being confused and wondering whether her boyfriend were not about to break up with her.

    Victor then presented her with a Barbie Volkswagen Beetle and insisted over and over that she “open the trunk.”

    “I put the ring in the trunk,” said Victor, who eventually slid off the couch and down onto one knee to propose to his high school sweetheart.

    The two wed on July 3, 2004 at the Catholic church Carrie grew up attending and celebrated with family and friends at a ceremony on Coronado Island, looking out at the San Diego skyline in the background.

    Carrie and Victor now have two children at the Lower School, their daughter Olivia and son David.

    “It’s unbelievable. I drop my kids off in the mornings and I remember being my daughter’s age walking around,” said Victor. “It’s super humbling. We feel immensely fortunate that our kids get to go here. It was an important and meaningful part of our lives.”

    “I was fortunate at 17 to meet my best friend in the whole world and Parker allowed me to do that,” added Carrie. “He is absolutely my soulmate, he is absolutely the person I want to spend my entire life with. I feel so fortunate that I was put in the situation that at such a young age I was able to meet my best friend.”

    Victor feels the same way.

    “Carrie has always been a wonderful friend and an amazing partner. We make a really good team. We’re just a really great match for each other,” said Victor. “We’ve been together so long, it’s pretty amazing that we’re more in love now than we’ve ever been. It’s a testament to all of the hard work and effort and love that she puts into our relationship and our family.”

    Lisa Iacono '94 and Andrew Ruff '94

    When Lisa Iacono ’94 and Andrew Ruff ’94 were named princess and prince of the freshman Homecoming Court in 1991, the couple had been dating for a little while.

    “We were just really good friends,” said Lisa, who started at Parker in grade 5. She and Andrew, a lifer, stayed friends throughout middle and high school, and although they dated briefly at Parker, their romance didn’t blossom until they were well into their college careers.

    Andrew was at the Naval Academy on the East Coast and Lisa was studying in the Pacific Northwest, but summers brought them back together in San Diego.

    “During our junior year of college, something changed,” said Lisa. “We both weren’t dating anyone and then the next thing we knew, we were dating.”

    The couple dated long distance before ending back up in San Diego. On Memorial Day 2001, Andrew proposed and the two were married at the La Jolla Women’s Club the following year. Parker alumni filled the wedding party, including Lisa’s maid of honor, Lesley Hazard ’94, who later married Andrew’s brother.

    Today, Lisa is a nurse and patient care manager at Scripps La Jolla, and Andrew is Chief Financial Officer at TGG Accounting, a company started by Parker alumni Matt Garrett ’93. Lisa and Andrew are also proud parents of two Parker students: daughters Ashley, Grade 5, and Madison, Grade 7.

    “They love Parker. They have great friendships and it’s a nice community for them,” said Lisa.

    Lisa said she sometimes jokes with her girls about meeting their future partners at Parker. “You never know, one of these boys in your class could end up being the one,” she would say.

    According to Lisa, her mother used to make the same jokes about Andrew: “My mother would always say we would end up together. She thought we would get married someday.”

    Her mother, of course, was right.

    “I feel so lucky to have Andrew as my husband and my best friend. He’s an amazing father to our girls and I truly feel very lucky to have him in my life,” said Lisa.

    For Andrew, the experience of growing up with his future wife at a school like Parker has been the most rewarding.

    “It’s an amazing experience being able to go through life’s adventures together,” said Andrew. “Thankfully, we’ve been fortunate that most of those adventures are rewarding and full of laughter and joy. Everyone has challenges. Being able to go through those with Lisa--with her strength, the type of wife she is, the type of mother she is--and relating that back to this shared experience of where we’ve come from has certainly been the most special part of my life.”


    Tessa Floodberg '05 and Nick LaPointe '05

    Tessa Floodberg ʼ05 and Nick LaPointe ʼ05 were both new to Parker when they met in Grade 7, but they didn’t start hanging out until their junior year. Tessa was friends with Nick’s older brother, Matt LaPointe ’04, who was more outgoing and social than his younger brother. It was through Matt that she eventually started to notice the shy guy in the back of her class.

    “I got to know Nick a little bit, and then he was in a bunch of my classes and I started seeing him as cute and quiet and adorable,” said Tessa.

    The two started dating the summer before their senior year, just after Nick left Parker and enrolled at a charter school. It was the age of AOL Instant Messenger so before Nick left, Tessa asked for his screen name and the two kept in touch.

    It didn’t take long for their love to bloom and despite being at different schools, the two dated all of senior year and nearly all of college. After 11 years of dating, Nick (finally) proposed on Easter Sunday in 2013.

    “I was growing impatient,” said Tessa, who said she joked that Easter morning that “there better be a ring in one of those eggs.” There was.

    During the egg hunt at her cousin Alli Wile Lundquist’s ’05 house, Tessa’s young nephew led her to a beautifully decorated egg. Her mother was filming the hunt to show Tessa’s father, who was in the hospital after suffering a heart attack, but had no idea she was about to capture this special moment on camera.

    Tessa opened the egg to find a ring box inside just as Nick got down on one knee to ask the love of his life to marry him. They showed the video to Tessa’s father later that day and started planning the wedding.

    Tessa and Nick were married on May 23, 2015 at Green Gables in San Marcos. They have been together for almost 14 years and have known each other for nearly 18. They are expecting their first child this May, a more than perfect third anniversary present.

    “Nick is the sweetest most genuine person I’ve ever met. I feel very lucky and fortunate to have met him at such a young age, to grow up together and fall in love and start a family. He’s my high school sweetheart and my soulmate. I don’t think I could live my life without him,” said Tessa.

    Nick, who is much more reserved than his “social butterfly” wife, had no trouble opening up to say how incredible she is.

    “Tessa is the most friendly, cheerful, trustworthy, thoughtful person I know and I would be by myself alone without her,” said Nick. “She’s brought out the best in me ... I can’t imagine being without her.”

    Tessa now works as a speech pathologist in Del Mar and Nick works with his parents at the family’s pool company. They still get together with their Parker friends as often as possible, with Tessa acting as the unofficial reunion planner.

    “I am ‘Parker Passion’ all the way. It’s just a part of me,” she said. Considering the impact the School has had on her life, it is no surprise she bleeds brown and gold.


    Ceri Slacum '86 and Stewart Keith '85

    Ceri Slacum ’86 claims she wasn’t a troublemaker at Parker, but Coach David Glassey must have thought differently when he chose to sit her next to Stewart Keith ’85 on the baseball bus back in the mid-1980s.

    “He wanted to sit me next to the person he thought I would make the least amount of trouble with,” said Ceri, then a junior and the baseball team’s scorekeeper.

    “I was the safety net,” said Stewart, a senior on the baseball team at the time. Little did Coach Glassey know, he had just played matchmaker.

    Ceri and Stewart began dating in April 1985, a few months before Stewart graduated and headed up the 5 freeway towards UCLA for his freshman year of college. The couple continued dating through Ceri’s senior year, but broke up as she prepared to start her first year at UCLA.

    Even in their newfound singlehood, Ceri and Stewart continued to hang out in the same social circles. Towards the end of Stewart’s senior year, Ceri volunteered to play wingwoman for a friend who was interested in Stewart’s roommate. They soon found themselves on a double date at a sorority party with two friends who never went out again; Ceri and Stewart, on the other hand, started falling in love.

    “When she came to UCLA and we had stopped dating, I still cared for her. I always wanted to know where she was to make sure she was adjusting to life in the big city. Deep in my heart I always hoped she would come back to me,” said Stewart.

    He proposed to Ceri a few years later when Ceri was still living in Los Angeles attending graduate school. Stewart had moved back to San Diego so they took turns visiting each other every weekend.

    “She came down to San Diego on the 5 am train,” recalled Stewart. “I showed up at the train station in Downtown San Diego at 8 am in a tuxedo holding a dozen roses.”

    Stewart got down on one knee as Ceri approached him on the platform and she said “yes” in front of a cheering crowd.

    The two married in 1992 and recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary. Their children, William, Class of 2018, and Erin, Class of 2021, are third-generation Parker students; their grandmother, Stewart’s mother, attended Parker through Grade 10, the highest grade level offered at the time.

    “For us, Parker is such a special place,” said Ceri, who is active in the Parents Association and taught at the School off and on for several years. “It was always that family school. My closest friends are all from Parker.”

    Those close friends include each other.

    “I never could have imagined myself with anybody else,” Stewart said.

    “No matter how far we got away from each other we always ended up back together,” added Ceri. “It was kind of like we were predestined.”
    Read More
  • Lancer Love Stories - Ceri Slacum '86 and Stewart Keith '85

    Ceri Slacum ’86 claims she wasn’t a troublemaker at Parker, but Coach David Glassey must have thought differently when he chose to sit her next to Stewart Keith ’85 on the baseball bus back in the mid-1980s.

    “He wanted to sit me next to the person he thought I would make the least amount of trouble with,” said Ceri, then a junior and the baseball team’s scorekeeper.

    “I was the safety net,” said Stewart, a senior on the baseball team at the time. Little did Coach Glassey know, he had just played matchmaker.

    Ceri and Stewart began dating in April 1985, a few months before Stewart graduated and headed up the 5 freeway towards UCLA for his freshman year of college. The couple continued dating through Ceri’s senior year, but broke up as she prepared to start her first year at UCLA.

    Even in their newfound singlehood, Ceri and Stewart continued to hang out in the same social circles. Towards the end of Stewart’s senior year, Ceri volunteered to play wingwoman for a friend who was interested in Stewart’s roommate. They soon found themselves on a double date at a sorority party with two friends who never went out again; Ceri and Stewart, on the other hand, started falling in love.

    “When she came to UCLA and we had stopped dating, I still cared for her. I always wanted to know where she was to make sure she was adjusting to life in the big city. Deep in my heart I always hoped she would come back to me,” said Stewart.

    He proposed to Ceri a few years later when Ceri was still living in Los Angeles attending graduate school. Stewart had moved back to San Diego so they took turns visiting each other every weekend.

    “She came down to San Diego on the 5 am train,” recalled Stewart. “I showed up at the train station in Downtown San Diego at 8 am in a tuxedo holding a dozen roses.”

    Stewart got down on one knee as Ceri approached him on the platform and she said “yes” in front of a cheering crowd.

    The two married in 1992 and recently celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary. Their children, William, Class of 2018, and Erin, Class of 2021, are third-generation Parker students; their grandmother, Stewart’s mother, attended Parker through Grade 10, the highest grade level offered at the time.

    “For us, Parker is such a special place,” said Ceri, who is active in the Parents Association and taught at the School off and on for several years. “It was always that family school. My closest friends are all from Parker.”

    Those close friends include each other.

    “I never could have imagined myself with anybody else,” Stewart said.

    “No matter how far we got away from each other we always ended up back together,” added Ceri. “It was kind of like we were predestined.”
    Read More
  • Lancer Love Stories - Tessa Floodberg '05 and Nick LaPointe '05

    Tessa Floodberg ʼ05 and Nick LaPointe ʼ05 were both new to Parker when they met in Grade 7, but they didn’t start hanging out until their junior year. Tessa was friends with Nick’s older brother, Matt LaPointe ’04, who was more outgoing and social than his younger brother. It was through Matt that she eventually started to notice the shy guy in the back of her class.

    “I got to know Nick a little bit, and then he was in a bunch of my classes and I started seeing him as cute and quiet and adorable,” said Tessa.

    The two started dating the summer before their senior year, just after Nick left Parker and enrolled at a charter school. It was the age of AOL Instant Messenger so before Nick left, Tessa asked for his screen name and the two kept in touch.

    It didn’t take long for their love to bloom and despite being at different schools, the two dated all of senior year and nearly all of college. After 11 years of dating, Nick (finally) proposed on Easter Sunday in 2013.

    “I was growing impatient,” said Tessa, who said she joked that Easter morning that “there better be a ring in one of those eggs.” There was.

    During the egg hunt at her cousin Alli Wile Lundquist’s ’05 house, Tessa’s young nephew led her to a beautifully decorated egg. Her mother was filming the hunt to show Tessa’s father, who was in the hospital after suffering a heart attack, but had no idea she was about to capture this special moment on camera.

    Tessa opened the egg to find a ring box inside just as Nick got down on one knee to ask the love of his life to marry him. They showed the video to Tessa’s father later that day and started planning the wedding.

    Tessa and Nick were married on May 23, 2015 at Green Gables in San Marcos. They have been together for almost 14 years and have known each other for nearly 18. They are expecting their first child this May, a more than perfect third anniversary present.

    “Nick is the sweetest most genuine person I’ve ever met. I feel very lucky and fortunate to have met him at such a young age, to grow up together and fall in love and start a family. He’s my high school sweetheart and my soulmate. I don’t think I could live my life without him,” said Tessa.

    Nick, who is much more reserved than his “social butterfly” wife, had no trouble opening up to say how incredible she is.

    “Tessa is the most friendly, cheerful, trustworthy, thoughtful person I know and I would be by myself alone without her,” said Nick. “She’s brought out the best in me ... I can’t imagine being without her.”

    Tessa now works as a speech pathologist in Del Mar and Nick works with his parents at the family’s pool company. They still get together with their Parker friends as often as possible, with Tessa acting as the unofficial reunion planner.

    “I am ‘Parker Passion’ all the way. It’s just a part of me,” she said. Considering the impact the School has had on her life, it is no surprise she bleeds brown and gold.
    Read More
  • Lancer Love Stories - Lisa Iacono '94 and Andrew Ruff '94

    When Lisa Iacono ’94 and Andrew Ruff ’94 were named princess and prince of the freshman Homecoming Court in 1991, the couple had been dating for a little while.

    “We were just really good friends,” said Lisa, who started at Parker in grade 5. She and Andrew, a lifer, stayed friends throughout middle and high school, and although they dated briefly at Parker, their romance didn’t blossom until they were well into their college careers.

    Andrew was at the Naval Academy on the East Coast and Lisa was studying in the Pacific Northwest, but summers brought them back together in San Diego.

    “During our junior year of college, something changed,” said Lisa. “We both weren’t dating anyone and then the next thing we knew, we were dating.”

    The couple dated long distance before ending back up in San Diego. On Memorial Day 2001, Andrew proposed and the two were married at the La Jolla Women’s Club the following year. Parker alumni filled the wedding party, including Lisa’s maid of honor, Lesley Hazard ’94, who later married Andrew’s brother.

    Today, Lisa is a nurse and patient care manager at Scripps La Jolla, and Andrew is Chief Financial Officer at TGG Accounting, a company started by Parker alumni Matt Garrett ’93. Lisa and Andrew are also proud parents of two Parker students: daughters Ashley, Grade 5, and Madison, Grade 7.

    “They love Parker. They have great friendships and it’s a nice community for them,” said Lisa.

    Lisa said she sometimes jokes with her girls about meeting their future partners at Parker. “You never know, one of these boys in your class could end up being the one,” she would say.

    According to Lisa, her mother used to make the same jokes about Andrew: “My mother would always say we would end up together. She thought we would get married someday.”

    Her mother, of course, was right.

    “I feel so lucky to have Andrew as my husband and my best friend. He’s an amazing father to our girls and I truly feel very lucky to have him in my life,” said Lisa.

    For Andrew, the experience of growing up with his future wife at a school like Parker has been the most rewarding.

    “It’s an amazing experience being able to go through life’s adventures together,” said Andrew. “Thankfully, we’ve been fortunate that most of those adventures are rewarding and full of laughter and joy. Everyone has challenges. Being able to go through those with Lisa--with her strength, the type of wife she is, the type of mother she is--and relating that back to this shared experience of where we’ve come from has certainly been the most special part of my life.”
    Read More
  • Lancer Love Stories - Carrie Snyder '97 and Victor Vilaplana '96

    As two Parker lifers, Carrie Snyder ‘97 and Victor Vilaplana ‘96 grew up together. Despite being a grade apart, they ended up in Mrs. Pope’s pre-calculus class during Victor’s senior year and quickly developed a friendship.

    “At first she thought I was trying to copy her math homework, but really I just wanted to talk to her,” said Victor.

    They started dating that summer, soon after Victor graduated from Parker and right before he moved north to start his freshman year at Stanford. Carrie attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, and the two eventually reunited in New York City where they lived together for three years.

    It was at their place in New York where Victor proposed to Carrie, who came home from her job as an investment banker at 11 pm to find Victor sitting on the couch, still dressed in his work clothes.

    “Everything was off,” said Carrie, who recalled being confused and wondering whether her boyfriend were not about to break up with her.

    Victor then presented her with a Barbie Volkswagen Beetle and insisted over and over that she “open the trunk.”

    “I put the ring in the trunk,” said Victor, who eventually slid off the couch and down onto one knee to propose to his high school sweetheart.

    The two wed on July 3, 2004 at the Catholic church Carrie grew up attending and celebrated with family and friends at a ceremony on Coronado Island, looking out at the San Diego skyline in the background.

    Carrie and Victor now have two children at the Lower School, their daughter Olivia and son David.

    “It’s unbelievable. I drop my kids off in the mornings and I remember being my daughter’s age walking around,” said Victor. “It’s super humbling. We feel immensely fortunate that our kids get to go here. It was an important and meaningful part of our lives.”

    “I was fortunate at 17 to meet my best friend in the whole world and Parker allowed me to do that,” added Carrie. “He is absolutely my soulmate, he is absolutely the person I want to spend my entire life with. I feel so fortunate that I was put in the situation that at such a young age I was able to meet my best friend.”

    Victor feels the same way.

    “Carrie has always been a wonderful friend and an amazing partner. We make a really good team. We’re just a really great match for each other,” said Victor. “We’ve been together so long, it’s pretty amazing that we’re more in love now than we’ve ever been. It’s a testament to all of the hard work and effort and love that she puts into our relationship and our family.”
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  • Lancer Love Stories - Olivia Nocon '99 and Nathan Nouskajian '98

    They’re sweethearts who went to high school together, but Olivia Nocon ’99 and Nathan Nouskajian ’98 aren’t traditional high school sweethearts. The two officially started dating on June 1, 1999, just before Olivia walked down the aisle at Commencement. Not having dated during high school made it “confusing” for their friends.

    “Our friends were perplexed,” said Olivia, laughing. “They couldn’t have imagined two totally different people being together.”

    Olivia, the extrovert, and Nathan, the introvert, complemented each other so well the two tied the knot on December 30, 2006 at Sunset Cliffs in San Diego--but not before a somewhat difficult proposal.

    “The proposal was impossible,” joked Nathan. “We’d been together so long that any deviation from our normal routine came with a thousand questions.”

    Nathan proposed at the couple’s favorite restaurant at the time, Top of the Market, and even though “the writing was on the wall,” Olivia was nevertheless surprised and excited.

    The wedding was a truly Parker affair. The wedding party and guests were made up of mostly Parker alumni and friends--after all, it was Parker that brought the bride and groom together.

    “I highly doubt we would have met if we hadn’t both been at Parker,” said Olivia. “It’s a nice feeling having known someone for so long.”

    Nearly a decade later, Nathan is a lawyer and Olivia takes care of their two children, Caden and Ava, both Lower School students at Parker. Neither can imagine their lives without the other.

    “Ollie makes my life better than I ever could have imagined,” said Nathan. “And even though we’re so different, it makes every day that much better being with her.”

    “This will sound contrived but it’s 100 percent genuine--I think Nathan is the kindest person I’ve ever known and the fact that he married me just blows my mind. I feel so incredibly lucky,” said Olivia.
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  • January

    Alumnae speak to students about career growth

    In the first of a three part alumni-student mentorship series, alumnae Deprise Brazel, Esq. ’10 and Morgan Justice-Black ’01 spoke to Parker internship students about leveraging networks, experiences, and skills to benefit their careers on Thursday, Jan. 11. After a brief introduction and brainstorming session, students broke into two groups for breakout sessions with each guest speaker.

    Deprise, who recently passed the bar exam and is interviewing for music attorney positions at major firms in Los Angeles, advised students that today’s world is all about who you know. She spoke of the importance of standing out by doing exceptional work and advised students to get to know people in different departments to expand their networks.

    Morgan, who works as Community Relations Manager at San Diego Gas and Electric, realized after working as a Development Director in the non-profit sector that she wanted to be the person giving money away, not asking for it. She dedicated her evenings to networking groups and volunteer organizations to gain pertinent experience and expand her professional network, and leveraged social media to help identify people she wanted to connect with.

    Thank you to Deprise and Morgan for sharing your valuable insight and stories with students. Fellow alumni - want to share your professional knowledge with Parker internship students? We have a couple of sessions left, email alumni@francisparker.org to get involved!
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Francis Parker School is a private, independent, coeducational, college preparatory day school for students in Junior Kindergarten through Grade 12 from across San Diego County. Founded in 1912, the Lower School is located on the Mission Hills Campus with the Upper and Middle Schools on the Linda Vista Campus. Parker's mission is to inspire a diverse community of independent thinkers whose academic excellence, global perspective and strength of character prepare them to make a meaningful difference in the world.

Mission Hills Campus Lower School

4201 Randolph Street
San Diego, CA 92103
 

Linda Vista Campus Middle/Upper School

6501 Linda Vista Road
San Diego, CA 92111
858 / 569-7900